Marin Sailing School Program for the Blind Marks 10th Anniversary

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Last weekend 11 visually impaired sailors marked Marin Sailing School Program for the Blind’s 10th year anniversary with a BBQ at TISC. Afterwards, volunteers, J/24s, Clipper Cove and SF Bay delivered smiles all around.  You’re invited to create smiles too!

Philip Kum, Al Spector, and Danette Davis founded the Visually Impaired sailing program back in 2007, first sailing out of Sausalito.   In 2012 they partnered with Treasure Island Sailing Center. On June 18th they celebrated ten years of launching new horizons for VI sailors.

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Now in its 10th year the program provides opportunities for individuals who are blind and visually impaired to learn the fundamental skills of sailing and the basic principles of seamanship. These students – soon to be sailors – learn to sail through the use of creative and adaptive methods in a hands-on, mainstream teaching environment.

The objective is the same as for sighted sailors: to harness the wind and to experience all the challenges and rewards of sailing. Learning to sail a boat, the physics of sailing, and the equipment used on board, builds self-assurance to meet day-to-day challenges and enhances confidence to try new things.

Clipper Cove, with its protected area, lack of current and steady winds, provides an excellent launching point.  The TISC J/24 fleet is an excellent boat for the program – stable yet responsive.  With common deck layout and rigging across the boats.

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Each day starts with a discussion of the day plan, then an on-boat orientation. Here are photos from the May 21st and June 18 sailing days.

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These sailors have a wide range of experience from just learning to those who have raced in events worldwide from Newport, RI to Rotorua, New Zealand. So the easy access from Clipper Cove to SF Bay is another bonus for the TISC location.
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Smiles all around after returning to the dock.  Then debriefing to share stories and more smiles.2016-05-21-VISailing-SMALL-134

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The program counts on an all-volunteer staff for each day of sailing.  Interested? Two simple requirements to participate in this great program.  You must be:

  • Comfortable as an instructor on a J/24, the boats used for the program here at TISC.
  • Willing to engage and focus on basic principles including the etiquette of working with visually people who are blind and visually impaired, communications and giving directions.

All these skills can be learned by attending a volunteer training day, or reading the EXCELLENT manual put together by Philip, Al, & Danette then “shadowing” another instructor for one of the volunteer sessions. So easy !

Upcoming VI sailing days at TISC are: 7/16, 8/20, 9/17, and 10/8. The program starts at 10 am and runs until 3pm.

Please contact Luxine Smith (luxine.smith@tisailing.org) at TISC if you have further questions or would like to spend a day you will likely remember as “a great, rewarding day – making new friends, giving back, learning something new and feeling really proud of helping others share the joys of sailing”.

You’re Invited !

Regards from On The Cove, Dave G

In the wake:

A HUGE HUGE tip of the hat to Brian Hill for the photos from the May 21st VI sailing day and Al Spector and Danette Davis for the photos from last weekend’s BBQ and sail. And to the staff at TISC for launching the J/24 fleet used by the VI sailing program.

In addition to a very complete VI sailing manual put together by Philip, Al, and Danette, here are other excellent resources:

Hooked on Clipper Cove

Clipper Cove offers quiet, protected water ideal for solitary anchoring or multi-boat raft-ups.  Many boaters and sailors spent Memorial Day Weekend on The Cove enjoying sunny weather, warm water and a sandy beach.

The south-west quadrant of Clipper Cove is protected from wind and waves.  Ample deep water for large boats to anchor very close to shore makes for easy swimming or rowing to the beach.  A truly unique anchorage in all of San Francisco Bay.

Twenty or so boats shared space on Clipper Cove last weekend. This was our view of the action from Treasure Island Sailing Center Saturday morning.IMG_3328

There were power boat raft-ups just off the beach. You can read the story behind Quarters 10 (in the photo below framed by the two sailboat masts) to learn more about the origin of this building and possible uses for it as Yerba Buena Island continues on its upgrade path.IMG_3247-cr1

Sailboats from around the Bay met, greetings and tie-ups were exchanged and additional raft-ups sprang up.IMG_3318-cr

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Along with many solo visitors who stayed the weekend.IMG_3321-cr

The anchorage in Clipper Cove is normally “home” to a small number of boats.  Here’s one that provided a backdrop to opening day last month.IMG_1958-cr

And more boats from the Memorial Day crowd.IMG_3242-cr

 

As we rounded the corner from South Bay and returned to the cove Saturday afternoon we were presented with this west-facing view of the many boats anchored in Clipper Cove. Framed by the bridge abutment on our port side and shadows from the main span above.IMG_3311-cr-cr

IMG_1488 - j24 framed by SF Cove and BugThere are many ways to enjoy Clipper Cove. Treasure Island Sailing Center offers Adult Sailing Lessons. Or sign up for the new TISC Adult Keelboat Certification class.

Recreational boaters are welcome to anchor in Clipper Cove for up to 24 hours.  For stays of longer than 24 hours you can register with the Treasure Island Development Authority (TIDA).  Here is the link to read more about Anchoring in Clipper Cove.

Regards from On The Cove, Dave G

In the Wake:

  • I found a 1939 photo of small boats, large schooners and steam ships at the West End of Clipper Cove.  You can see it here.
  • And if you missed last month’s blog that showed 723 visitors having fun smiling, paddling, kayaking and sailing you can see those smiles and photos of Opening Day and Safe Boating Day hosted by TISC and sponsored in part by the California Division of Boating and Waterways.

TISC Opening Day 2016 Packs Clipper Cove

TISC Opening Day and Safe Boating Day packed Clipper Cove with 723 excited attendees.  Thank you staff, sponsors, volunteers and Mother Nature for providing free sailboat rides & paddling on protected waters, fun, games and free life jackets.IMG_1958

IMG_2133Next week is National Safe Boating week. The Treasure Island Sailing Center hosted its combined Opening Day / Safe Boating Day on April 30th to kick off our season and get a head start on summer safety. And to pass out 140 life jackets plus water safety and boating guides courtesy of California Division of Boating and Waterways

Group 3 - enhancedPlanning and promotion starts months in advance. Then our trusty army of 50-plus volunteers starts arriving Friday afternoon, early Saturday morning and stay well past closing.  Opening day would not be possible without volunteers from the Cal Boating team, the Vanguard 15 racers, Envision Academy Sailing Team (E*A*S*T), TISC tenants who helped with set-up & boat driving, and the local Treasure Island community.

Sperry LineUpVisitors from all over the Bay Area lined up for the free sailboat, kayak and paddle board rides.

Our fleet of J/24’s, RS Ventures, kayaks and stand up paddle boards were all voted MVP’s of the day.IMG_2212

Safe in CCove6-crcr Safe in CCove7IMG_9526CG AuxUS Coast Guard Auxiliary answered questions and further stressed safe boating. And passed out the free DBW life jackets.

IMG_9460Talented supporting cast from Glitter in the City and TISC volunteers kept kids of all ages psyched and occupied during the day.  Needless to say Peets Coffee in Berkeley and Beauty’s Bagels in Oakland were morning favorites, while  Adam’s Grub Truck was the preferred afternoon stop for many hungry sailors.

Clipper Cove is the only venue in San Francisco Bay that can host events like this because of the steady winds, protected space, lack of current and easy water access via docks and ramps. IMG_2178IMG_2227IMG_1992 IMG_2149

It’s no wonder nearly 4,000 children, youth and adults sailed or paddled on Clipper Cove last year.  This number 1,338 San Francisco 4th graders who took part in 51 TISC-sponsored hands-on STEM classes plus sailing in RS Ventures during 2015 (since Fall, 2013 SSL inception, TISC has sponsored 3,566 students in 135 classes from 31 SFUSD elementary schools).

On this picture perfect day all areas of the cove provided a fun, safe and protected place to sail and paddle. IMG_2027 Kayak Dad2 kayaker 6IMG_1916As ideal and safe as Clipper Cove is for our opening day festivities we still had several safety boats on duty.  In a few cases even the light winds lead to a few paddlers “calling for a taxi”.Rescue 1 Rescue 5

I didn’t see much traffic to and from the marina, however the boats I did see were careful and respectful of the smaller craft that dotted the cove.
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Not everyone was ready for getting out on the Cove, and our team had plenty of fun and games lined up for the future sailors.Dad & boy at bubbles

Which is not to say kids were left ashore. To the contrary they were focused and engaged in all points of sail (including the very active 2 year-old who triggered our man-overboard drill when he threw his dad’s new hat overboard).
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Based on the many phones and cameras I saw, I’m guessing Facebook, Twitter and Instagram had plenty of action from our visitors.IMG_1941

Kayak selfies1Clipper Cove is a great place to admire the new Bay Bridge. IMG_9530

Hard to see in the above photo, however the eastern area of the cove is very shallow before getting much deeper as you depart the cove and head to the flats. And this bottom bathymetry is exactly what keeps the high currents out of the cove.

So another TISC Opening Day is on the books.  Now YOUR family’s fun can begin.  Here’s the link with an overview of the many classes offered by Treasure Island Sailing Center:  http://tisailing.org/basics.

And as you head out onto California waters this summer, WEAR YOUR LIFEJACKET.wear-it-calif-web

Regards from On The Cove, Dave G

PS – A special tip-of-the-hat to Valerie Santori and Andrew Shaw for many of the photos in this blog post.

In the wake:

Here are a few more links to the California Division of Boating and Waterway website:

 

 

July Smiles On Clipper Cove

July is a great month for smile creation on Clipper Cove.  School is still over the horizon, the skies are bright blue, and afternoon winds fill sails and create smiles.IMG_7028

With three weeks of summer classes to go kids are charged. IMG_6905

And TISC instructors are leading the enthusiastic parade. Mother Nature has been on best behavior (for the most part).IMG_7557Our younger sailors start in Bugs.  Classes are structured to focus on goal setting and building confidence from day one.  Many kids think capsizing drills are “just the best”.IMG_7487

Classes progress into Opti’s.  This is where kids begin to really figure out the winds on Clipper Cove.  IMG_6895

Those who have mastered all points of sailing are allowed to venture past the eastern end of the cove between Pier 1 and the new Bay Bridge Tower. Advanced students who sail here benefit from stronger winds and the ability to recognize “tide lines” and learn more about the currents which can be very strong in the deeper water in this area.IMG_6882 IMG_6900

Youth sailors utilize our FJ fleet to prepare for regional regattas. This class is also popular with many colleges and we use them for our Envision Academy Sailing Team (E*A*S*T).IMG_7022

No surprise to anyone familiar with youth sailing that fun Friday’s are a big hit with all ages.  This is when skills learned during the week get parlayed into games of all types.

As our sailors “mix it up” with each other and in different craft on these free-form Friday afternoons, it’s clear their skills have progressed over the course of their one or two-week sessions.  They test the limits of the boats, weave in/around each other with ease and display advanced helmsman-ship.IMG_7481

Self-esteem runs high with confidence not only on the boats but also in and around the water.IMG_7170-cr

Teamwork abounds.  As skipper and crew on boats. IMG_7134

During water play on stand-up paddle boards (SUPs to some). IMG_7183 IMG_7184Here is a 17 second video of energetic “TISC SUP Dancing on Clipper Cove“.  And another of “TISC Kids Dancing on the Beach in their PFDs“.

And working together providing taxi service around Clipper Cove.IMG_7442

Or just figuring out the best way from water to J/24 jumping spot.IMG_7574

Which of course is where one jumps !IMG_7575

The safety and serenity of Clipper Cove is hard to beat no matter how you are paddling around. Even if you flew in for the day.IMG_7212IMG_7209

Blue-sky sunny days also make for fun times in our RS Ventures when powered up with asymmetrical spinnakers.  More “high speed” bonding opportunities for instructors and youth.IMG_7619 IMG_7623

The new Treasure Island Sailing Center registration page is now on-line.  Plenty of time left to sign up for one or more sessions that run through the middle of August.

Regards from On The Cove, Dave G

In the wake:

Clipper Cove is not just for kids ! Tuesdays and Thursdays are V15 racing nights on the cove. Anyone wishing to try their hand at more advanced levels of sailing can do so here on Clipper Cove.IMG_7338

SUP and kayakAnd there are plenty of opportunities for everyone in the community to enjoy water-play of all kinds here on Clipper Cove. Register here for kayaking and stand-up paddle boarding.

Clipper Cove can also be a place to relax especially in the morning when the beach is quite and the winds still sleeping.Clipper Cove from above Western Beach_resize

 

Gordon Lau Elementary Maps SF Bay History

Gordon J. Lau Elementary school fourth graders from Chinatown studied canoes, schooners and container ships at TISC on Monday. And mapped SF Bay mystery spots using compasses.  Hands-on-the-tiller of a real sailboat created big smiles – no surprise there.compass IMG_5037

smiles-MG_4952Last year eleven hundred fourth graders from SFUSD spent a Set Sail Learn (SSL) day at Treasure Island Sailing Center.  You may have read the stories from Francis Scott Key, Cleveland & Feinstein, and John Yehal Chin schools.  By the end of 2015, 3,000 students will have benefited from this unique experiential learning program, selecting a choice of three curriculums: Ecology of the Bay, Maritime History or Alternative Energy.BB tower-IMG_5049

Half the class spent the morning sailing on Clipper Cove in the shadow of the new Bay Bridge Eastern Span, the other half in our activity center.  After lunch, they switched. Teachers love the fact curriculum is provided in advance and each student is given their own workbook.

Those in the activity center studied boats of all sizes and learned how they fit into the Maritime History of San Francisco Bay.  Some were tiny, some huge. The container ships in Oakland appeared closer than they really were.

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tall-ship IMG_5058cont-IMG_4941Another topic – compass navigation. Students identified five “mystery spots” around the bay, always setting a course from Clipper Cove.  For example: Steer a course bearing 320 from Clipper Cove.  During the mid-1940’s, when America was involved in World War II against Japan, this was the place where many Japanese people were forced to stay.plotting IMG_5144

Wildlife abounded during the day. The Western Grebe welcomed the morning classes.  After lunch sea gulls were constant companions.  A seal was also reported.Grebe welcome IMG_4914 seagull-IMG_5111

boat-barge-IMG_4944The kids sailed past a barge bound from Pt. Richmond heading south and watched a trimaran sailing west into Clipper Cove anchorage. Full disclosure: not every future sailor was able to point to each of the five “mystery points” after the morning compass lesson, however 100% were excited to return to Clipper Cove. Our “no kid ever denied sailing lessons” philosophy encourages all SSL students to sign up for one of our summer sessions,boats-barge-IMG_4942 boat-trimaran-IMG_5095

crown princess-IMG_5081Views from all points of the compass opened up new vistas – majestic cranes, more container ships, San Francisco skyline and the shadowy details of the new Eastern Span of the Bay Bridge.  Those with sharp eyes were treated to a view of the Crown Princess in town for the day.cranes-IMG_5045 container-stern-IMG_4995

container ship-IMG_4948transamerica frames j24-IMG_4915IMG_5118Crown Princess IMG_5147Mentioned here last but always stressed first: SAFETY. Every student in each of the 64 SSL classes to-date has always been briefed on boating safety and equipped with a life jacket on the docks and in the boats. We use J/24 and RS Venture sailboats – safe and ideal for this program.safety IMG_4895 boat-j24-IMG_4920 boat-rsv-IMG_4981

TISC Launched SSL in 2013 with support from the America’s Cup Organizing Committee and Mayor Ed Lee’s office.  The program provides an experiential learning opportunity open to every fourth grader in the San Francisco Unified School District at no charge.  Our objective: open a door to the Bay and the world of sailing using hands-on lessons while teaching 4th grade core standards.

Based on the smiles we saw Monday the kids from Gordon Lau Elementary enjoyed the dose of STEM mixed with their hands-in (the water) experience.touch-IMG_4958smiles-IMG_5012smiles-IMG_5014 smiles-IMG_5087 smiles-IMG_5138 smiles-IMG_4954 smiles-IMG_4991Regards from On The Cove, Dave G

In the wake:

Hi-resolution downloads of the pictures above – and more – are available for sharing with school representatives and parents.  If interested please contact the TISC office.

By the way, thanks and a tip-of-the-cap to our excellent instructors who are vital to the success of the SSL program. inst-IMG_4985-cr

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Clipper Cove – Our Platform for Smiles and Self-Confidence

TISC teaches life lessons and builds self-confidence in under-served youth and new sailors. Best wishes for 2015 as we give credit where credit is due, to Clipper Cove – our platform for smiles, volunteer hours, goal-setting, teamwork, communications and leadership.

Clipper Cove from the EastTreasure Island Sailing Center is fortunate to be located on arguably one of the best venues in the US if not the World for teaching life lessons to under-served children and youth while providing access to water sports for our entire community.  Clipper Cove is unique in its central location, protected waters, predictable winds, minimum effect of the tidal currents and access to San Francisco Bay for sailing year around.

views IMG_1078Below are favorite pictures taken on Clipper Cove since we started photo-blogging three years ago.  No particular order, simply a collection of groups and activities with two commonalities – smiles and Clipper Cove.

TISC provides community outreach so kids can learn about the bay after school and during the summer.  And adults come here to access SF Bay for many reasons including lessons, community sailing, and organized racing.outreach IMG_0314_resize (2)

outreach IMG_1831 outreach IMG_9962community IMG_0435More and more today youth and adults are realizing sailing is not just about racing; they’re using the wind as a free source of propulsion to simply have fun and enjoy what Mother Nature has given us.  And the Bay’s shoreline provides a nice alternative path to exercise.community_GGY1751

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Clipper Cove is generally gentle most mornings.  Ideal time of day for new sailors to learn the basics of sailing.gentle IMG_2938 enjoy and respect IMG_1507 gentle  IMG_0056_resize (2) gentle IMG_0048_resize (2)

Of course sailors love wind and even our novice sailors soon progress to a point where flying spray and feet dragging in the water makes for a fun time.  North west summer arrive predictably around 11 am most days and build until 6pm.windy TISC-homeward bound

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windy optis onclippercoveAs counter-intuitive as it may seem to non-sailors, capsize drills seem to be at the top of the list with many TISC students.  Could be their confidence and self-esteem showing through, or the chance to jump in, or simply a way to remind themselves and others that they’re in charge.  Clipper Cove is a safe, ideal place for such drills, well away from the currents prevalent in nearly all other bay locations.

safety and more safety IMG_0113_resize (2) safety righting a bug - 4533

IMG_1886smiling capsize onclippercoveAnd along with the basics of sailing come the life lessons we speak of so often such as goal setting which is a pathway to self-confidence, communications which must be a way of life on the water and teamwork which is pretty much an integral part of any sailing program – it’s just plain natural for kids to help each other in almost any aspect of the sport from launching to sailing to putting away at the end of the day.team building IMG_9895 IMG_1882 teamworkteamwork TISC-on the board

team racing IMG_2406-crFriday afternoons offer a chance for our sailing classes to kick back and have fun on the beach.  Many days outreach classes, PE classes from local schools and youngsters from our young “Harbor Seals” can be found on protected beach at the western end of Clipper Cove.relaxing IMG_1460 team building IMG_1536 relaxing  IMG_0290_resize (2)

IMG_1833-young smiles onclippercoveAs students progress, our lessons introduce leadership for those interested in taking their skills further – into teaching, coaching, on to college and beyond.  TISC provides internships and scholarships for these talented youth, many of whom represent our next generation of Bay Stewards.   IMG_1907-JI smiling

IMG_1764 JI coachingIMG_1782 ji and kids smilesClipper Cove is home port for the Cal Berkeley Sailing Team in the fall and SF Bay Laser and V15 fleets in the summer.  Winter brings out the BAYS high school regatta.IMG_9536-calsailing-onclippercove

community clipper cove plus kids and parents-en

Since TISC launched Set Sail Learn in the fall of 2013 over 1,600 fourth graders from 33 schools have sailed on Clipper Cove.  These newest visitors to Clipper Cove have come from 59 San Francisco fourth grade classes. crab watching_resize JYC Seaweed Discovery JYC Crab Lab at TISCSSL IMG_0031_resize (2) SSL  Rommel framed by TransamericaRegards from On The Cove, Dave G

In the wake:

The Treasure Island Sailing Center Foundation raises money so no child or youth who wants to take lessons or join in our outreach program is ever refused for their inability to pay. Last year our summer and outreach programs  hosted 968 youth.  Our community sailing events, always open to the public, and adaptive sailing and Co-Able Youth lessons provided access to the bay for another 1,000+ participants.  Here are a few more of the many smiling faces from 2014:pointing and smiles IMG_9633 IMG_0449 IMG_4130 IMG_1787 co-able smiles with MMIMG_1748 IMG_1683 IMG_1641 IMG_1637 IMG_1073 IMG_0904 IMG_0701 smiles framed by bay bridge IMG_0649 IMG_0559

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37 Sailing Superlatives from Huckleberry

Huckleberry Outreach SailConnect a TISC instructor, one motivated volunteer and 11 Huckleberry Wellness Academy students with J/24′s on Clipper Cove and you get 37 Sailing Superlatives! Here’s what the kids had to say, and how you can share your passion for sailing.

The Huckleberry Wellness Academy – San Francisco is an intensive three-year health career pipeline program that fosters interest and engagement in health-related professions. It’s primarily funded by a grant from San Francisco’s Department of Children, Youth, and their Families, one of our partners.

We asked the Huckleberry students for a “one liner”  to describe their June 26th afternoon sail with us.  Below is what they had to say, interspersed with pictures from the day.Bow Happy

“I am a Huckleberry student and I had never gone sailing before, but it was amazing! Feeling the breeze and being controlled. It was really fun and I do hope to come back again. Thank you so much for this opportunity. I had a blast!” – Yasmin two j24s in open water

“It was a great experience. Probably one of the best experiences ever. I am going to buy a boat now.” – Wayland        Three smiles

“Fun, exciting, amazing, awesome, fascinating, and peaceful. It was a nice first time sailing experience. I’m definitely looking forward to sailing again!” – Wendy three smiles fwd of mast“The sailing trip was memorable, exciting, lovely, amazing, crazy and mostly fun. I had lots of fun and hopefully in the future, I’ll be able to go sailing again.” – Emely two j24 framed by breakwall

“Thanks for the awesome sailing experience! I’ve had tons of fun and learned a little on how to steer/sail a boat.” – Benton tioga with six

“I really had a great time. I enjoyed myself a lot. It was a total different experience being in such a peaceful place rather than the chaotic streets of San Francisco.” – Alex Sonya plus five“It was fun and an amazing experience. I enjoyed sailing.” – Luisapeacock watching wave  “If you haven’t sailed before you should. You can’t have the same experience elsewhere.” – Vinsonsmiles and salute

“It was fun, exhilarating, one of a kind experience, great close up view of sea lions, breathtaking experience steering the sail boat, and an amazing way to bond with others.” – Edgarsmile under the boom

“It was an amazing experience. We had loads of fun and you feel fab! It’s fantastic and awesome. I encourage everyone to go sailing – and the people were friendly.” – JudySonya Driving

Teaching life lessons through sailing is a great mission loved by everyone here at Treasure Island Sailing Center.  Our programs provide opportunities for 4th graders, make a difference for youth who sail here, and benefit tenants who call TISC home port.  Our 2014 instructors, including Sonya above, are experienced sailors and savvy teachers.

We couldn’t do what we do without the volunteers who help maintain our docks and facilities, support our many events and share their love of the water and the lessons they’ve learned with the kids, youth and adults who sail here.  Tioga, green shirt below, donated his afternoon with the Huckleberry youth on Clipper Cove and out on the bay.  These first-generation college bound students now understand a bit about the wind, sails, tides and how to steer courtesy of his passion and experiece.TiogaI encourage every tenant who can sail during the week, or on weekends when we host visually impaired sailors, to call Chris Childers in the TISC office and schedule time for on-the-water passion sharing.  I can’t think of a better way for you to meet the volunteer hours called for as part of your boat storage agreement with TISC.  And face it, no one has ever had a bad day on the bay while providing a launching point for new horizons for kids and youth !

Regards from On The Cove, D-

In the wake:

This is the first time I had to use a spreadsheet to track all the flowery adjectives and adverbs used to describe and outreach class.  Here’s the list of 37 sailing superlatives (OK, only 32 if you’re an english teacher however 44 if you add “sailing”)  I mentioned above:

Amazing (5), awesome (3), breathtaking (1), enjoyed (2), exciting (2), exhilarating (1), fab (1), fantastic (1), fascinating (1), first (1), friendly (1), fun (7), future (1), great (3), learned (1), lovely (1), memorable (1), nice (1), opportunity (1), peaceful (2)

 

 

Windy Week on Clipper and McCovey Coves

Monday morning’s high winds and cool temperature on Clipper and McCovey Coves were not normal. Didn’t bother outreach groups and students – they love feet dragging in the water and butts on the rail.  Nice view from Bay Bridge bike path.

smiles on a j24j24 framed by transamerica towerWhen high pressure areas dominate early in the morning, as they did last week, afternoon winds can build quickly into 15-20 puffs. With reefed mains on the J/24s used for outreach kids and proper coaching for the dinghy students Clipper Cove comes alive with smiles all around.

The Sunset Neighborhood Beacon Center visits to TISC are part of their summer program which serves 400 youth in elementary and middle school.  Chilly temperatures and gusty winds clearly don’t dampen their appreciation of what Mother Nature has to offer on Clipper Cove.

Treasure Island Sailing Center, through our own fundraising efforts and the generous donations from individuals and corporate sponsors, enable youths from all parts of the Bay Area to experience the fun of feet dragging in the water.  These kids leave TISC with memories to treasure and respect for the world in which we live, a world within easy view of downtown San Francisco and just under the bridge from the Port of Oakland.j24 windy feet in waterfeet in water framed by oakland cranesopti with safety boatYouth participating in one- or two-week sailing classes at TISC benefit from our top-notch team of experienced instructors, always encouraging and leading students to take the next step. Last week’s windy Monday provided a chance for true seamanship to shine through.

Early morning cat’s paws provide ample opportunity for learning about safety afloat, wind direction and capsize drills.  The afternoon breezes can excite youth about sailing and develop higher levels of confidence and self esteem.  Enter the fun of “butts on the rail” sailing in San Francisco Bay !opti in 15-18

left exit for TISCClipper Cove sailing in the morning is often a hunt for whispers of wind.  Our instructors use these normal light-air mornings for drills focused on boat handling and teamwork. You can see a video of one of these tacking drills HERE.

These pictures from last Wednesday morning were taken from the bike path on the new eastern span of the Bay Bridge. We’ve been wanting to check out this path, and were pleasantly surprised how easy it was to access – the entry point is just across Shelmound from the Emeryville IKEA store.  In a year or so this path will enable bikers to drop down to Treasure Island.  For now the path stops at the top of the bridge 185 feet above the bay.

TISC classes framed by bay bridge construction

Co-Able Kids 14-06-20It was windy last Monday over on McCovey cove as well.  Five youth joined TISC instructors  and South Beach Yacht Club volunteers to kick off the inaugural session of the first-ever Co-Able Youth Sailing Camp. Sponsored by the Bay Area Association of Disable Sailors and TISC, this summer camp will combine students with and without disabilities in such a manner that they will encourage and assist each other to become independent sailors.

More McCovey Cove smiles from the BAADS/TISC partnership in a future post.

Regards from on (Clipper and McCovey) Coves, D-

PS – Speaking of windy days, the TISC V15 and Laser fleets race every Thursday evening in the summer.  Here are a few tips on how to stay dry when sailing a dinghy in a breeze on Clipper Cove courtesy of V15 Fleet Captain Al Sargent.

In the wake: below are a few more pictures from Sunset Neighborhood Beacon District and some taken along the Bay Bridge Bike Path.

SNBC framed by Bay bridgeSNBC Smilespath to bay bridgeon the bay bridge bike path old bay bridge deconstruction

Bay Marine and Signarama San Jose Deliver New J/24 Looks

The TISC J/24 fleet is sporting newly-painted hulls and crisp graphics thanks to Bay Marine Boatworks and Signarama San Jose.  This project was funded by the 34th America’s Cup and ONESF. Summer smiles now available for all San Francisco youth.Delos and Barney off to Pt. Richmond

Delos and Barney headed for Bay Marine Boatworks last October.  Five more Js followed.  The project managers, painters and yard team delivered a class job on every boat.  Even though a couple appeared as if “they had been used as rounding marks during a hard-fought regatta”, all were returned with smooth, attractive white hulls.

The team at Signarama San Jose provided design support for the bow and stern graphics as well as the registration numbers for the J/24 fleet.  They guided us through the installation of the 35 unique graphics fabricated for our project, and helped us adapt the design and layout to our RS Venture and FJ fleets.

Ol yeller - beforeThe most dramatic change was in “Ol Yeller”.  Quite a difference between the before-and-after appearance. The picture on the left was taken during a Life Learning Academy field trip last year.  The two below show the progress through the painting process and departing Bay Marine.

Ol Yeller DisapearingOl Yeller Departing Bay MarineWe’re using the same names for our new boats for now.  We’re looking for sponsors who might want to see their names or logos on our J/24 fleet.

The new look on our J/24s didn’t go unnoticed during opening day last month.  We had a number of compliments, along and a few questions about where our “new fleet” came from.paddle and sails framed by bridge J24 Cruisin

Our J/24 fleet is used for adult sailing and keelboat lessons, and for many outreach programs during the week.  Here are a few smiles from a recent San Francisco Expeditionary School day at TISC, along with our new hulls with Bay Marine Boatworks and graphics from Signarama San Jose.

bay bridge bow

water boy

stern horizontal

bow boys with bridge

Registration for our Summer Classes starting June 2nd is open. We still have availability in most classes, and are always looking for kids interested in developing life skills while learning to sail and enjoy the water.  The registration page for our youth summer programs is HERE.  Registration page for all programs is HERE.

At TISC we never turn a child away.  Our doors are always open to anyone or any group who has the desire to learn and grow through sailing.  Scholarship forms are here: Individual Scholarships   /    Group Scholarships

Regards, from On The Cove, D-

In the wake:

Many volunteers who helped with the J/24 transits fromTISC to Bay Marine and then. THANK YOU !

 

 

Opening Day: Sails, Paddles and Smiles On Clipper Cove

Saturday’s Opening Day Featured blue skies, steady winds, eight sails, a bunch of kayaks & paddleboards, and hundreds of smiles. Our supportive volunteer force worked Wednesday through Saturday.  Kudos to our TISC team for a job well done!Kayak J24 Bridge

Opening day was combined with Safe Boating Day this year. The rain on Friday was unusual however the Cal Sailing Team showed up to finish the set up anyway, then returned first thing Saturday to make sure all was ready and greet visitors.  No way this event happens without their dedicated support.

Parents and students also turned out in force to help set up and manage beach logistics.  It was great to see them having fun while giving back. Thanks also to the Life Learning Academy volunteers.Parents Setting Up

MadisonThere are many, many, many moving parts to opening day.  Some happen in real time, some must be ready days, weeks or months in advance. Madison Gattis, our Director of Operations, has been on this since the beginning of the year.

 

ChrisOnce the day started Chris Childers, our Programs Director, oversaw the boats, dock workers and hundreds of guests on Clipper Cove.  New this year was the use of the west beach for the water toys with launches transporting guests to/from the docks to the beach.

AnnieAnnie Butts, our Head Instructor, had her hands full with driving, coordinating crash boats and answering lots of volunteer questions. Thanks also for her many hours of boat prep prior to the event.RS Ventures Ready

  • Staging the paddleboards and kayaks at the beach and using launches to ferry people to and from was a great idea.  This plan provided a completely separate venue and afforded a different view and experience for non-sailors.  Not everyone came to sail, yet everyone enjoyed being on Clipper Cove. Here again, volunteers were in place to help ensure safety.Beach Girl

Beach Hands

 

 

 

 

 

The old Eastern Span of the Bay Bridge is being deconstructed.  You can see the initial gap which will continue to widen over time.Bay Bridge Deconstruction

Bay Bridge Framed by J24

The highlights of the day were the huge smiles, compliments, high-fives and sincere thanks from the many guests (we stopped counting sometime after 500) who attended Opening Day 2014.  Some were repeats from last year; many were new to Clipper Cove and wanted to bring their families out for awesome time on the water courtesy of Treasure Island Sailing Center.Painted Face with Wind in HairYoung Driver West Coast Sailing

Skipper in TrainingThree Smiles on Deck-resize Four sail boats departed the docks every fifteen minutes from 11:30 until 3pm. Do the math;  that’s over 300 opening day sailboat rides.  Our volunteers registered all these people, gave them a safety briefing, fitted life jackets and escorted them to and from the docks for embarking and disembarking the five J24s and three RS Ventures. Many thanks to the TI Vanguard and Laser fleets, Cal Sailing, TISC tenants, and Bay Area Association of Disable Sailors for keeping managing the constant flow on the ramps and docks.  Special thanks to the V15 and Laser sailers for setting up the tent (and taking it down tomorrow).Dock Boarding Instructions Dock Lined up to Sail Dock Volunteer

Mother Nature favored us with a gorgeous day.  Rather windy toward the afternoon, which put an even higher premium on the efforts from Cal Sailing team who helped with dock logistics the entire day.  Here are three smiling faces who greeted just about all my guests; this was taken after my last trip – they’re still smiling!Smiling Cal Dock Hands

Regards, from On The Cove,

Dave G

In the wake:

Many of the great pictures above, including the first which captured the variety of the day framed by the new Bay Bridge Eastern Section, were courtesy of Valerie Santorini from Golden Gate Yacht Club.  She and other GGYC volunteers spent the entire day On Clipper Cove ferrying guests from the dock to the beach while taking great pictures.  Thank You Val !!