TISC Teaches Life Lessons: Like Teamwork For Example

TISC uses sailing as a platform to teach life lessons including goal setting, teamwork, communications, and leadership and develop self-esteem.  We raise money for scholarships so that no child is ever turned away. This blog is about teamwork.

Teamwork can be a challenging concept out in the real world.  Working together on Clipper Cove, however, seems to come naturally to most kids.  Smiles and good times overshadow the fear of new adventures or working in a group of new friends.

Here are a few examples of teamwork in action from Treasure Island Sailing Center. A great place to start is at the beginning of the season when volunteers, many from our V15 fleet, gather to install our docks and ramps.DockInstall TeamTeamwork lowering dock section Dock Cleaning TeamAs I was reviewing teamwork pictures from the year I realized that even before the docks went in volunteers were at work transporting our J/24 fleet to and from Bay Marine Boatworks for new bottom jobs.Launch Newly Painted HullDelivery Team Bill and Peter Homeward BoundStepping masts on BUGs is first on the menu during our fall session sailing classes which started last week.Mast Stepping TeamInstructor and TeamTeamwork is required for hoisting J/24 sails.  The first picture below was from an early season outreach program with kids from the San Francisco Expeditionary School.  The second was taken during set sail exercises in anticipation of a June sail with visually impaired sailors from the Morin Sailing School Program for the Blind.Team Hoisting J24 Main Visually Impaired Orientation TeamOpening day provided many opportunities for teamwork in preparation for the 850+ visitors who attended a variety of event on land and on the water.Opening Day PrepThere are always plenty of opportunities out on the water for demonstrating teamwork whether sailing or paddling.  The Cal Berkeley Sailing Team practices at TISC during their season. They sail here and also team up with our shore-based team.

CalSailing Team Sailing Flat We launched the first-ever Co-Able sailing camp on San Francisco Bay – a partnership between Treasure Island Sailing Center and the Bay Area Association of Disabled Sailors.  This unique program was run out of Pier 40.co-able smiles with MM Kayaking is another “team sport” that ranks high with TISC kids.Teamwork on KayakWhile the objective of sailing is to stay in the boat most of the time, we stress the importance of feeling comfortable in the water.  And in many cases kids just like working together to scramble from the water back into a boat.Capsize Recovery Team SF Exped. Teamwork climbing aboard

Teamwork also counts out on the water.  Friendships are built, smiles are shared.  Exciting memories last forever.IMG_0230_resize (2)IMG_0272_resize (2)IMG_0273_resize (2)

Even 4th graders who participate in SSLearn classes have the opportunity to work together and present results to classmates from recent discoveries.  Not exactly Toastmasters, however a good confidence builder. SS Learn Team Report

All good days must end.  These pictures were taken as kids returned to the dock from an expedition to the western shores of Clipper Cove ( aka “Mexico Beach).  Teamwork required all around from TISC instructors as well as their precious cargo.back from Mexico

Retrieving and washing boats usually signifies the end of a fun day On Clipper Cove.Retrieval Team Opti Recovery team Cleaning TeamAs we wind down our summer sessions we’re getting cranked up for the first SS Learn classes to start.  Thanks to the San Francisco America’s Cup Organizing Committee and Citry of San Francisco’s ONESF:Celebrate the Cup program every fourth grader in San Francisco will be able to spend a day on the bay learning about the ecology of the bay and Dungeness crabs, San Francisco maritime history, or renewable energy. And go for a sail at Treasure Island Sailing Center on Clipper Cove!
Regards, from On The Cove,   Dave G

In the wake:

Speaking of teamwork, the TISC team expanded this week as we welcomed aboard Travis Lund, our new Waterfront Director.

Bay Marine and Signarama San Jose Deliver New J/24 Looks

The TISC J/24 fleet is sporting newly-painted hulls and crisp graphics thanks to Bay Marine Boatworks and Signarama San Jose.  This project was funded by the 34th America’s Cup and ONESF. Summer smiles now available for all San Francisco youth.Delos and Barney off to Pt. Richmond

Delos and Barney headed for Bay Marine Boatworks last October.  Five more Js followed.  The project managers, painters and yard team delivered a class job on every boat.  Even though a couple appeared as if “they had been used as rounding marks during a hard-fought regatta”, all were returned with smooth, attractive white hulls.

The team at Signarama San Jose provided design support for the bow and stern graphics as well as the registration numbers for the J/24 fleet.  They guided us through the installation of the 35 unique graphics fabricated for our project, and helped us adapt the design and layout to our RS Venture and FJ fleets.

Ol yeller - beforeThe most dramatic change was in “Ol Yeller”.  Quite a difference between the before-and-after appearance. The picture on the left was taken during a Life Learning Academy field trip last year.  The two below show the progress through the painting process and departing Bay Marine.

Ol Yeller DisapearingOl Yeller Departing Bay MarineWe’re using the same names for our new boats for now.  We’re looking for sponsors who might want to see their names or logos on our J/24 fleet.

The new look on our J/24s didn’t go unnoticed during opening day last month.  We had a number of compliments, along and a few questions about where our “new fleet” came from.paddle and sails framed by bridge J24 Cruisin

Our J/24 fleet is used for adult sailing and keelboat lessons, and for many outreach programs during the week.  Here are a few smiles from a recent San Francisco Expeditionary School day at TISC, along with our new hulls with Bay Marine Boatworks and graphics from Signarama San Jose.

bay bridge bow

water boy

stern horizontal

bow boys with bridge

Registration for our Summer Classes starting June 2nd is open. We still have availability in most classes, and are always looking for kids interested in developing life skills while learning to sail and enjoy the water.  The registration page for our youth summer programs is HERE.  Registration page for all programs is HERE.

At TISC we never turn a child away.  Our doors are always open to anyone or any group who has the desire to learn and grow through sailing.  Scholarship forms are here: Individual Scholarships   /    Group Scholarships

Regards, from On The Cove, D-

In the wake:

Many volunteers who helped with the J/24 transits fromTISC to Bay Marine and then. THANK YOU !

 

 

Farewell Ol’ Yeller

Ol’ Yeller is at Bay Marine Boatworks getting painted thanks to volunteers Jeff, Cory, and Michael.  Fortunata and Great White are back.   We’ll soon have seven great white hulls ready to be rigged for summer classes.  Here’s 22 kids’ smiles.

Jeff Knowles with Ol Yeller Mast

Jeff Knowles helped unstep Ol’ Yeller’s mast in preparation for the transit to Bay Marine in Pt. Richmond.  Unfortunately, two engine failures and a dead battery ended our day shortly after we left the dock.

A week later we departed again, this time using our 15′ ribby to tow Ol Yeller across the bay and retrieve Fortunata and Great White.  Mother nature served up a great day for the transit.  Ready to Launch

Cory Schillaci and Michael Weinman prep for transitCory Schillaci and Michael Weinman graciously stepped in to help with the rescheduled transit.  With the mast out and the boat already prepped for delivery we were able to depart Clipper Cove by mid-morning.

 

 

 

We rounded the Pt. Richmond outer mark shortly after 11.  Mt. Tam provided a photogenic backdrop to our morning transit.

Mt Tam Backstop

We admired the great paint job served up by the team at Bay Marine as we watched Fortunata and Great White (we joked that ALL our J’s are now great white) being dropped in for the return trip to TISC.  If you look closely you can see Fortunata in the shiny reflection on Great White’s hull.

Great looking great white

Two identical boats head back out the channel – on their way home to join another four great-looking white hulls back at Pier 12 in Treasure Island.Departing Pt RichmondHere’s a couple of pictures from Mike.  The first as we pass an oiler that was running lifeboat drills when we first arrived, and the second as we rounded Great Oak Victory on the way back to SF Bay.GW and Fortunata Under Tow from Bay Marine The bay was rather quiet, however we did pass a couple barges on the way home.

A visitor passes aftThe trip back to Clipper Cove was aided by the wind at our back and a flood tide that helped on the final leg of our journey. Back On Clipper Cove

The hulls on six of our seven J/24’s are now refinished; the team at Bay Marine will have the seventh done soon.  We’re getting close to “crunch time” for our opening day on April 26th.

We can use help re-stepping the masts our our J/24 fleet, updating the traveler systems so the boats can be used for both sighted and visually impaired sailors, cleaning up the interiors, and adding graphics to the new hulls so we can keep track of which “great white’ hull is which.  There are many ways you can help.

  • Make a donation to help defray the cost of the new graphics
  • Spend 2-3 hours to help step the mast on two of the boats
  • Volunteer to work on  clean-up on one or two of the interiors; or help pressure wash the decks
  • Donate or purchase new bow and stern lines for one or more of the boats
  • Purchase two new dock bumpers for your boat and donate the older ones to TISC – or just buy two new ones for our J24 fleet !
  • And for the really handy volunteer, join one of our teams working on re-fitting the traveler systems to prepare for our blind sailing days.

To volunteer, donate parts or make a tax-deductible cash gift please let me know (daveg@onclippercove.com) or contact the TISC Team in the TISC office (email info@tisailing.org or call 415-421-2225).

Regards, from On The Cove,

D-

 

In the wake:

Here are 22 smiles from our picture archives – courtesy of  Ol’ Yeller:

Sailing east of Treasure Island with blue water in front and TransAmerica Tower off the dirt quarter.

East of TI Fun on the Cove LLA-off to clipper cove Smiles from the West Side Smiles on Clipper Cove Wave from Ol Yeller

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fourth and Three

Rajat Dutta up topTwo volunteers joined forces to help un-step J/24 masts and complete a round-trip to Bay Marine last week. Four shiny white hulls are done with three to go. Bonus enclosure: directions for navigating Clipper Cove at low tide.

Rajat Dutta, long-time crew on Melges24 “Posse”, donated a morning to prepare Fortunata and Great White for delivery to Bay Marine Boatworks. We’ve been using the small hoist  to unstep masts for the J/24 upgrade program; this approach works well and saves time over the traditional use of gin poles. A +6.5 tide helped.

Bill Nork DocksideA few days later Bill Nork, TISC friend and frequent volunteer, helped with the over-and-back transit from Clipper Cove to Point Richmond; we left on schedule at 11am.  Our normal journey of 90 minutes stretched to two hours because of the unusual NE breeze, strong ebb current and missing motor mount on Great White.

No complaints for Mother Nature – we had a blue sky day with balmy temperatures for a January morning and the Bay to ourselves.

Great White Heads to Bay MarineAs we passed Red Oak Victory the air felt warmer once out of the cool n’easter on the bay.  Beef Cakes and Blue Stripe looked bright, white and ready to go.  After a quick motor switch we headed back to TISC.Fortunata passing Red Oak Victory Bill Nork Thumbs UpThe return trip was much faster; just over 90 minutes from dock to dock thanks to the wind at our back, a boosting current and two motors in operation. The views of the “new” Beef Cakes and Blue Stripe framed by Golden Gate Bridge and Berkeley Pier led to thoughts of “what next” for the graphics on these bright new hulls -suggestions welcome !Bill and Peter Framed by GGBBill and Peter Passing Berkeley Pier
Even with dusk approaching, our four newly painted hulls looked clean and bright.
Four J24s completeAs the sun set on the Western end Clipper Cove the tide lines were clear.
Clipper Cove Sunset at Low Tide

There’s only one more transit before our J/24 fleet will have all new bottoms.  If you are interested in helping, let me know.  Next to providing rides to visitors on opening day and taking pictures of kids smiles, this has to be one of the best volunteer jobs we “offer” to our tenants and friends.

Regards, from On the Cove,
Dave G

In the wake:

Even with a speedy return trip we rounded Pier 1 later than planned and not much ahead of a -.04 tide. While not the lowest of lows (that would be around -1.6) we did have to be mindful of our entry into Clipper Cove.

If you’re in a similar returning situation (or trying to get out for a practice session) hug the large pier closely – no farther than 1-2 boat lengths away. Proceed nearly all the way to the rocks bordering TISC and then take a sharp left 3-4 boat lengths from breakwall. This path may not Low Tide in Clipper Coveenable a 3′ draft to pass over the sand bar across the entry at tide levels shallower than -.5 to -1.0, however it’s your best bet.

For deeper draft boats, not much choice other than stay away from low-low tides; if you must make a transit during low tide use best efforts to do so on a flooding tide not an ebbing tide. That way if you do get stuck your “down time” will be minimum. The boats shown on the right exiting Clipper Cove as we returned did not make it out until the tide began rising.

Two “New” J/24s Join TISC Fleet

Last month we delivered Delos and Barney to Bay Marine for bottom painting. They’re back looking brand new! We swapped them with two more J/24’s before rain and wind announced winter’s arrival on Clipper Cove. Next step: stripes & graphics.

Michael and Jasper before transitMichael Weinman and I splashed Beefcakes and Blue Stripe last Monday.  We were ahead of schedule after un-stepping the first mast.  As with most boat projects sailing is not always smooth.  The mast on Beefcakes was stuck and would not budge.

Jasper Van Vliet arrived for transit duty at 1030.  Additional attempts to remove the mast failed so we headed for Bay Marine.

Jasper and I left Clipper Cove with clouds behind us and blue sky ahead of us.TI under clouds and blue sky

transit to bay marineWe were greeted by an enthusiastic welcoming committee as we rounded the entrance to Pt. Richmond harbor. welcoming committee cr

The SS Red Oak Victory, one of 534 Victory class Cargo ships built for WWII, served as a second waypoint.  She was turned over to the Richmond Museum of History in 1998 after an act of congress in 1996. SS Red Oak Victory crRed Oak Victory 20mmm gun

Two freshly-painted J/24s were launched and waiting for us. Our decision to transit Beefcakes with the mast up to save time proved to be a good call – the pros at Bay Marine and their industrial-strength crane made short work of the mast removal.A and B by bay marine cr

The 90 minute return journey to TISC was cloudy. Winter is one of the few times we see clouds around here and they always seem gorgeous over SF Bay whether sky blue or stormy gray.blue sky in gray clouds

boat B under SF cloudsA three tanks runWe completed our second refueling as we neared Treasure Island.

Plenty of time to think about boat graphics on the way home with a brand new pearly-white hull on my starboard quarter for an hour. Our current thinking is a blue boot stripe, possibly an upper accent highlight, bow numbers, and CA registration number. And graphics. Bold graphics to showcase our refurbished fleet.

The big questions are how to name the boats and which graphics would look best while remaining durable.  Feel free to send along your thoughts or suggestions (daveg @ onclippercove . com).  If you or your company would like to sponsor one or more boats and/or sails even better!  Imagine how great your name/logo would look on the side of a J/24 with kids smiling as they learned life lessons on Clipper Cove.

Boat A by Sutro cr

Blue Stripe at NightEven with help from the pros, favorable tides, and only one “hitch”, daylight ran out before we washed and retrieved both J’s.  The reflection of the new Bay Bridge was another reminder of how attractive shiny these new hulls will be – especially with bold new graphics on their hulls.

Regards from On the Cove, Dave G

In the wake:

The history behind the SS Red Oak Victory is intriguing. Here’s the link to a virtual tour of the ship.

Connecting the Donor Dots

Thanks to supportive donors and generous grants our J/24 fleet has grown to seven.  Because of volunteers like Michael, Nigel and Sam, Delos and Barney headed for Pt. Richmond in yesterday’s fog. They’ll look new after Bay Marine Boatworks finishes.fog and bay bridge frame Clipper Cove

As we drove over the new Bay Bridge back to TISC after delivering two  J/24’s and a trailer to Bay Marine I was struck by the number of people and organizations who made this first step in our fleet renovation possible.  As always the beneficiaries of their generosity are kids in our summer youth classes, year-around outreach program, and just-started SS Learn program.

delos arriving at TISC DockDelos arrived on New Year’s Eve 2009.  I remember the ultra high tide as we motored from Marina Green to TI, arriving to a Bay Bridge still very much under construction.  The motor donated by Adam Slote and the trailer from RIch Jepson at OCSC are still key ingredients to our fleet.  While the bottom growth on Delos was not as populated with marine Delos Keelgrowth as we found on Barney, it did take some serious scraping to remove it.

When I asked Michael Weinman to help with our transit to Richmond, I made sure he knew this was a fun “messing about in boats” job, not the grungy job he signed up for when Barney arrived.  You may recall that clean up job from a previous blog.

Nigel and Mike unstepping the mastNigel Tunecliff showed up early Wednesday to help get boats launched and masts out..  We decided to use the 1-ton crane rather than ginn-poles, and with the tide rather low all proceeded smoothly after coaxing a few turnbuckles clockwise. Michael arrived right on time just as we removed the second mast..

With Delos and Skipper’s Gift motors mounted, Michael and Sam Warner got under way slightly behind schedule after a rudder switch on Delos. While starting to lift, the fog was still very much with us as they headed into a rather gray bay to “Red 6” just outside the Richmond Break wall.Departing for Pt. Richmond

Left at the end of Pier 1Michael took these two pictures after they turned north at Pier 1 and as they ghosted  past Angel Island. Sam ghosts past Angel Island

Bay Marine Boatworks will sand and fix the hulls, apply two coats of epoxy, then polish the hulls above the waterline.  To accomplish this they will use our only road-worthy trailer, retired  earlier this year from Moore 24 duty after Karl Robrock’s gracious donation in support of Matt Harper’s gift of Barney.

My plan to get a nice picture with the sun out and two J/24’s teaming into Richmond Breakwater was foiled by Michael and Sam’s rapid transit. They made it just over 90 minutes !Mike and Sam at Bay Marine

Many connections, donations and volunteer hours lead up to our J/24 Fleet upgrade. The final and most critical was this summer’s donation from Team Luna Rossa via the Americas Cup Event Authority.  Funds from their donation provided the opportunity for the work now being started at Bay Marine, and for the furniture in the new Activity Center now on line to support SS Learn.  Both support our goal of providing launching points for new horizons for kids of all ages.

Regards from On the Cove,

Dave G